In the News

July 11, 2019

As California inches ever closer to a direct and potentially landscape-altering conflict with the NCAA, the state took another step Tuesday toward allowing its collegiate athletes to profit off of their names, images and likenesses.

For the full report, click here.

July 11, 2019

NCAA student-athletes cannot profit from their own image, name, or likeness. The Fair Pay to Play Act seeks to change that.

For the full report, click here.

July 9, 2019

State Sen. Nancy Skinner, D-Berkeley, said the bill confronts racist biases that the country, including the criminal justice system, was founded on. She said the research is clear that racial assumptions put black residents more at risk.

“We do not want this just to be symbolic,” Skinner said. “We actually want to change that bias, and thus reduce the deaths.”

For the full report, click here.

July 8, 2019

The UC Berkeley athletics department took in $95.5 million last year from sources like ticket sales and the sale of media rights. The players received little more than their scholarships, if that.

That’s because NCAA rules prohibit students from accepting paid sponsorships or endorsements. But a bill making its way through the Legislature would make California the first state to let student-athletes at public and private campuses profit from the use of their name, image or likeness beginning in 2023. And for the first time, student-athletes could hire a licensed representative.

July 8, 2019

Hayley Hodson’s volleyball career took off when she was still in high school, with an invitation to compete on the U.S. Women’s National Team. As she traveled the world winning medals, the Newport Beach student took care not to run afoul of NCAA eligibility rules barring prospective college athletes from accepting financial compensation, her sights still set on playing for a top school. She turned down an endorsement deal with a sunglasses brand and the stipend offered to her teammates, she says, telling herself there would be time later to play professionally.  

July 3, 2019

The passage of SB1421 was a hard-fought battle to give the public transparency about police misconduct in their communities.

No one — least of all the agencies that have sworn to protect and serve the public — should be allowed to thwart the law.

For the full editorial, click here.

July 2, 2019

Too many police agencies are dragging their feet, ignoring the requirements of the new law, SB 1421, and an appellate court ruling that it applies not only to records about incidents this year but also to those of the past.

State Sen. Nancy Skinner, D-Berkeley, authored the law. She says she’s prepared to hold hearings to shame agencies into compliance and look at toughening the requirements to ensure these records are released. We welcome that. It can’t happen soon enough.

July 1, 2019

“They’re trying to thwart the law,” said state Sen. Nancy Skinner, D-Berkeley, the author of SB 1421. She said she’s open to amending the bill to require quicker release of records. “We need to have (legislative) hearings to … shame these agencies for refusing to comply with the law.” It’s “absolutely the … wrong example to set for the rest of the local government agencies.”

For the full report, click here.

July 1, 2019

Enter state Sen. Nancy Skinner, D-Berkeley, whose SB 206 would require California’s public and private colleges and universities to permit athletes signing endorsement deals.

“Imagine if in any other billion-dollar industry, like TV and movies, college students were the primary source of the talent that generated the revenue for that business and those college students were completely denied compensation,” Skinner told the Los Angles Times last week. "There would be a universal outcry. And yet we say it’s OK for athletes.”

June 28, 2019

It’s always fun to see a bully get upended in the schoolyard. So we should be grateful to the NCAA for providing us with such a spectacle in Sacramento — and for demonstrating, in the process, its increasing irrelevance.

The issue on which the National Collegiate Athletic Assn. tried to bully the California Legislature involves pay for student athletes. More specifically, it’s whether student athletes should be compensated for the use of their “name, image or likeness” (often abbreviated as NIL).