In the News

August 27, 2020

SB 776 by Sen. Nancy Skinner (D-Berkeley) would enhance recent laws requiring public disclosure of police records.

 

August 26, 2020

Another gauge of legislative seriousness is a bill by state Sen. Nancy Skinner, D-Berkeley, to open more police records to public and press scrutiny. Building on a 2018 law by Skinner that has unearthed evidence of police misconduct, SB776 would extend its provisions to records related to use of force, wrongful arrests, sexual misconduct and racial and other discrimination.

 

August 25, 2020

Senate Bill 776 by State Sen. Nancy Skinner, a Democrat from Berkeley, adds to her 2018 reforms by ending the culture of secrecy around records of police misconduct and abuse.

 

For the full op-ed, click here.

August 20, 2020

SB 776 (Skinner), would increase the transparency and reporting on the use of force incidents involving officers.

 

August 5, 2020

After winning approval in 2018 to loosen confidentiality rules protecting nearly all police personnel records, state Sen. Nancy Skinner, D-Berkeley, is pushing to expand public access even further.

July 16, 2020

“Our juries now in California are wealthier and whiter than California residents as a whole, and certainly wealthier and whiter than most of the people who they are sitting there to judge,” said State Sen. Nancy Skinner, D-Berkeley, who co-authored the bill, in a press conference Wednesday.

July 16, 2020

State Sen. Nancy Skinner, D-Berkeley, proposed similar legislation last year that failed. She said California must fix a system where jurors are typically wealthier and whiter than “most of the people who they are sitting there to judge.”

July 16, 2020

 California recently boosted state tax refunds for low-income filers, a move that will likely prompt more low-income people to file tax returns, according to state Sen. Nancy Skinner, a Democrat from Berkeley.

“Our juries now are whiter and wealthier than California residents as a whole,” she said.

July 6, 2020

“We need that change in opinions toward incarcerated individuals,” state Sen. Nancy Skinner, D-Berkeley, told me. “Not only are you incarcerated, but it’s a permanent sentence because once you’re released you have so many barriers. You are an outcast.”

July 2, 2020

Skinner, who represents Oakland and neighboring East Bay cities, was visibly emotional even behind her California state flag mask, and she said she still couldn’t understand the rationale behind the transfers.

“How (could there) have been a transfer with people that had not been tested for two or three weeks?” she said. “It’s abhorrent.”